Woodstock

Woodstock

Woodstock sits at the entrance to the Cotswolds and is probably best known for its proximity to Blenheim Palace. But there is a lot more to Woodstock than that – to start with, there is a great deal of history. There is rather thin evidence that King Alfred came to Woodstock in 890 (the name means stockaded settlement in a wood) and Ethelred the Unready (978-1016) certainly held Council at Woodstock and issued a decree for the maintenance of peace for the whole nation.

At the time of the Norman Conquest (1066), Woodstock, which was sparsely populated, was in the Wychwood Forest and was listed in the Doomsday Book as forest land reserved for hunting. It was Henry I (1100-1135) who built a stone wall, 7 miles in circumference, to enclose a park in which stood Woodstock Manor House which he used as a hunting lodge.